These valuable retro toys and games could earn you a fortune

Tuesday, 18th August 2020, 2:45 pm
Updated Tuesday, 18th August 2020, 4:47 pm
Any ‘90s child will remember these furry and chatty toys. (Shutterstock)
Any ‘90s child will remember these furry and chatty toys. (Shutterstock)

If you are looking to make an extra bit of cash this summer, it may be worth having a look in the loft.

Childhood toys that may have been collecting dust in recent years could actually be valuable collectables, worth hundreds if not thousands of pounds.

Nostalgic boomers and millennials have been listing their attic finds online for years as a quick income supplement. While it is worth noting that asking prices don't equate to a sold price, it could still pay to know your toy’s potential worth.

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Here are just some of the retro toys currently that have been listed online for surprising amounts.

Hot Wheels cars

Hot Wheels cars originally sold in the 1960s are now being listed online for hundreds of pounds.

One online seller put their vintage car toy up for sale for £434.36 which is a dramatic increase for the original price - the equivalent of merely 48p when it first went on sale.

Original Furby

Any ‘90s child will remember these furry and chatty toys. Bursting onto the scene in 1998 to become one of the most popular toys in the years following, they became an iconic staple in many a millennial’s early memories.

However, if you happen to own the original version in an unopened box, they could give you more than just a trip down memory lane, and fetch you up to £600 online.

Beanie Babies

These toys were purposefully collectables to start with, and many children’s rooms were filled to the brim with these stuffed animals.

However, one of the most valuable ones today is Peanut the Royal Blue Elephant, which - due to a manufacturing error - saw 2,000 made in a darker shade than intended.

This mistake has now produced the most collectable Beanie Baby out of the lot, and online they are being listed for up to £3,700.

Other valuable Beanie Babies include the 1997 Princess Diana Beanie Baby. which is listed online for anything between £5,000 to £25,000.

However, many have disputed its actual worth. The Humphrey the Camel Beanie Baby is valued at around £1,500 online.

Game Boy

Nintendo's beloved handheld game system which was first released in 1989 is now being listed online for hundreds - so long as they are in mint condition.

If you were an ungrateful child who never once picked up your console, this could actually have paid off in the long run, as unplayed Game Boys in sealed boxes are worth the most, with one seller managing to sell theirs for £260.

A used gadget could still get you hundreds, as one seller sold their used Gameboy, for £215 last year. However this sale did include 12 games.

The Original Monopoly game

While most of us have played many a tense game of Monopoly, testing our friendships and family ties along the way, not many of us will own an original hand drawn oilcloth version of Monopoly, made back in 1933.

Such vintage editions of the trying game have sold for thousands online, while limited editions sell for hundreds.Fisher Price's Push Cart Pete

This vintage Fisher Price wooden pull toy from 1936 can reel in more than £2,000 online. Considering the original toy initially sold for no more than 50 American cents, this is an incredible mark up.

Pokemon cards

Nineties kids spent large parts of their childhood trading Pokemon cards in the playground, and now some of the cards are fetching up to £5,300 on online shops such as eBay.

Considering Pokemon cards were sold at roughly £4 to £7 per pack in the ‘90s, this could net you some serious profits.

So far, the highest price ever paid for a single card was £43,450. This was the super rare Pikachu Illustrator card, which was bought at an auction in the US in 2016.

For the best chance of a sale and a big profit, the most valuable cards tend to be of the holographic variety, which come in three different types.

Some of these cards merely have a holographic Pokemon image, others have holographic edges, and the rest have an entirely holographic card.

First edition Barbie

After over 60 years of trading, Barbie now comes in all shapes and sizes. However the classic, hourglass-shaped version from 1959 is the collectors’ favourite.

Original dolls fitted with zebra-stripe swimsuits and a popular ‘50s style up-do, have been placed on sale for anything from $8,000 (£6,000) to around $23,000 (£17,500).