Spot mysterious moving lights over the Midlands last night? Here's what they were and when you can see them again

A mysterious string of lights was spotted moving across Midlands skies last night by hundreds of people.

Monday, 20th April 2020, 8:29 am
Updated Monday, 20th April 2020, 8:29 am

But don’t worry, an alien invasion isn’t on the way.

If you were one of many puzzled by the dazzling light show last night, here’s what you saw – and when you can them again.

Star gazers were being treated to a stunning display by Starlink – Elon Musk's Space X project – in the skies above Western Europe last night

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The lights were spotted across the Midlands. (Photo: YouTube).

Starlink is the informal name for the entrepreneur’s out of this world scheme which plans to create a constellation of thousands of low-orbit small satellites to improve internet service.

However, while many were left puzzling about the mysterious train of lights snaking across the night sky, many astronomers have slammed the billionaire for the project which they claim is 'a crime against humanity'.

They think the satellites are getting in the way of scientific observations and make it difficult for them to view the night sky as they reflect light.

They can interfere with the technology experts use to see distant phenomena, which is ground-based radio telescopes.

Many users on Twitter who spotted the Starlink express compared the sightings to Santa streaking across the December skies with his reindeer.

But others deemed it a 'total blot on the skyline' and expressed their sympathy for astronomers.

Social media users in Colorado posted photos on March 7 after spotting the row of lights moving slowly through the sky.

There are currently more than 300 Starlink satellites circling the globe, part of a constellation of thousands of satellites, designed to provide low-cost broadband internet service from low Earth orbit.

SpaceX says putting a 'constellation' of satellites in low earth orbit would provide high-speed, cable-like internet all over the world.

Musk has previously said the venture could give three billion people who currently do not have access to the internet a cheap way of getting online.

The firm eventually plans to launch 4,425 satellites into orbit above the Earth - three times as many that are currently in operation.

Tonight Starlink will pass over the UK at 21.55 for about 20 minutes.