Review: The Love Song of Alfred J Hitchcock is a rare experience

The Lovesong of Alfred Hitchock
The Lovesong of Alfred Hitchock

It’s a risk, trying to compete with Downton Abbey, so it was no surprise that the Pomegranate’s Sunday night audience was on the thin side.

It’s a risk, trying to compete with Downton Abbey, so it was no surprise that the Pomegranate’s Sunday night audience was on the thin side.

But New Perspectives are a class act, and for the diehards who chose live theatre over TV drama, The Love Song of Alfred J Hitchcock was a rare experience.

The great film director has been portrayed on screen several times recently, but David Rudkin’s play took a rather different viewpoint: from inside Hitch’s own head.

Skilful lighting and sound effects brought to life his macabre imaginings, memories and dreams, revealing the burden of darkness and guilt he carried and drew on to create his classic works.

Martin Miller recreated Hitch himself, a marathon role which kept him on stage almost continuously. Roberta Kerr (Coronation Street’s predatory Wendy Crozier) was the demanding mother who damaged him and the redheaded wife who supported him despite his lifelong obsession with blonde women. Anthony Wise and Tom McHugh played assorted associates and dream figures.

It was only in Chesterfield for one night, but catch it in Derby Theatre on November 8 or 9.

LYNNE PATRICK