Young stopper stoical about his Spireites exit

Chesterfield v Belper Town in the Derbyshire Senior Challenge Cup quarter final, Tuesday January 9th 2018.  Chesterfied win after a penalty shootout. Chesterfield keeper Dylan Parkin makes a save. Picture: Chris Etchells
Chesterfield v Belper Town in the Derbyshire Senior Challenge Cup quarter final, Tuesday January 9th 2018. Chesterfied win after a penalty shootout. Chesterfield keeper Dylan Parkin makes a save. Picture: Chris Etchells

Being released by Chesterfield was both disappointing and surprising for Dylan Parkin, but not the end of the world.

The 19-year-old goalkeeper, who has signed for National League North Boston United, opted for stoicism when reflecting on his Proact exit.

It came at the end of a season that saw him come as close to first team action as possible without actually making the breakthrough.

Amid a goalkeeping crisis that necessitated the arrival of two emergency loan stoppers, Parkin made the bench 21 times.

The crisis began with the retirement of Tommy Lee, a man Parkin looked up to, but even when number two Joe Anyon broke his arm Parkin knew deep down he wouldn’t get the nod.

“It was a tough time for me when Tommy retired,” he said.

“I learned a lot from him on and off the pitch, he was a good friend and a mentor.

“I was out on loan (at Sheffield FC) playing games which is all I wanted to do.

“I knew that I wasn’t going to play for Chesterfield at the time because Joe has that experience where as I was still young and learning a lot.

“I would have loved the chance to play but experience plays a big part in that.”

When Chesterfield announced that none of their out of contract players would get new deals, Parkin’s response was understandable.

“It was disappointing especially at my age,” he said.

“I was slightly surprised with the situation at the club and thought I’d have a chance of getting another contract but things change and people have to do what they have to do.

“A lot of players my age will have taken the release as an end of the world matter but I’ve taken it as a learning process.

“Footballers get released a lot and if you can hold your hands up and say you gave everything then you have nothing to look back on.”

As for the future, Parkin’s philosophy is simple.

“I want to play football and that’s the main thing for me,” he said.

“As long as I’m playing I’m happy.”