John Sheridan aware of people's expectations when it comes to how Chesterfield will play, but he's prioritising substance over style

John Sheridan is back at Chesterfield
John Sheridan is back at Chesterfield

Jon Sheridan is well aware of the expectations on his teams to play attacking football, but he's more concerned with winning football.

The manager says substance rules over style, because his Chesterfield side need victories to get out of the National League drop zone.

He began his tenure as Spireites boss on Saturday with an FA Trophy win over Bedford Town.

It was a game in which Town dominated possession against a team plying their trade three divisions below, and the ball stayed on the deck for the most part.

This weekend brings his first league game, at fellow bottom-four side Aldershot Town.

Sheridan knows people will make certain assumptions about the way the Spireites will play under his care, but insists his sides can defend as well as attack.

His priority won't be any particular type of football, but wins.

"I think people expect the way I manage, attacking wise, and I do try to concentrate on scoring goals, you've got to score goals to win games," he said.

"At the same time, I've been at clubs where we've had 20-odd clean sheets in a season.

"I think it's about winning games, whatever type of football we try and play, we just need to win games."

The new gaffer wants Chesterfield to be good in all areas.

"I just want us to be a solid team, hard to beat, but have players who are effective.

"The players who are good at attacking, be good, know what your strengths are. We need to score goals.

"The ones you expect to defend, they need to defend. We need to be strong defensively, you can't keep leaking goals.

"Clean sheets give you a chance to win games."

"But we play as a team."

Much was made of Sheridan's 'demanding nature' at previous club Carlisle, which appeared to be a problem for some in his high-flying squad.

He says he wants players to feel free to express themselves, as long as they're doing the 'right things.'

"I like players playing with freedom, not being frightened of making mistakes," he said.

"If you make mistakes just get on with it, as long as you're trying the right thing."