Former title-winning Spireite recalls life under Sheridan and reveals what current Chesterfield crop can expect from new boss

sp91198 Chesterfield FC 2011-2 Back Row L-R, Scott Boden, Derek Niven, Matt Needham, Jordan Bowery, Aaron Downes, Nathan Smith, Jamie Lowrie, Gregor Robertson, Simon Ford. Middle Row L-R, Jamie Hewitt, Ben Watkis, Craig Clay, Dean Morgan, Greg Fleming, Tommy Lee, Dwayne Mattis, Dan Gray,Jordan Burrow, Mark Allott, Shane Nicholson. Front, L-R, Dean Holden, Drew Talbot, Tendayi Darikwa, Mark Crossley, John Sheridan, Barrie Hubbard, Tommy Wright, Jack Lester, Mark Randall, Danny Whitaker.
sp91198 Chesterfield FC 2011-2 Back Row L-R, Scott Boden, Derek Niven, Matt Needham, Jordan Bowery, Aaron Downes, Nathan Smith, Jamie Lowrie, Gregor Robertson, Simon Ford. Middle Row L-R, Jamie Hewitt, Ben Watkis, Craig Clay, Dean Morgan, Greg Fleming, Tommy Lee, Dwayne Mattis, Dan Gray,Jordan Burrow, Mark Allott, Shane Nicholson. Front, L-R, Dean Holden, Drew Talbot, Tendayi Darikwa, Mark Crossley, John Sheridan, Barrie Hubbard, Tommy Wright, Jack Lester, Mark Randall, Danny Whitaker.

A member of John Sheridan’s 2010/11 League Two title winning side says the current crop of Spireites can expect honesty from their new boss.

Later today Sheridan will make a return to the club he left in September 2012 and Gregor Robertson, who featured in the side who won promotion to League One, has backed his old gaffer to bring more success to the Proact.

Npower Football League Two 'Lincoln City v Chesterfield FC at Sincil Bank 'Gregor Robertson

Npower Football League Two 'Lincoln City v Chesterfield FC at Sincil Bank 'Gregor Robertson

The former Chesterfield defender says he always knew where he stood with Sheridan.

“Personally, I always really enjoyed playing for him,” said the Scot, who retired in 2016 to pursue a career in journalism.

“The first thing any player asks for in a manager is honesty.

“There’s no doubt that he’s honest.

“He can occasionally be a little too honest for some people.

“You always enjoyed going into training every day, training was fun.

“On a Saturday when the business time comes around, he’s up front and tells you what he wants and expects.

With the Spireites currently ensnared in the National League drop zone and fighting a third successive relegation, recruitment will be key for Sheridan.

It’s an area in which the club have struggled in recent seasons and a major factor in their decline from a League One challenger to a non-league struggler.

Robertson believes Sheridan will do well in his second stint as Chesterfield manager, if he gets his signings right.

“If he can bring in the right players, which I think has always been a great strength of his, I’m sure he’ll bring success.

“He’s always been excellent in the transfer market, very rarely made a big signing in my time there, has a lot of very good contacts in the game and that’s something Chesterfield are in need of.”

In 2010/11 Chesterfield plundered 85 League Two goals and finished top by five points from runners-up Bury.

Robertson says their willingness to get forward is something Sheridan is known to instil in his sides.

“Myself and Dean Holden were two full-backs playing centre-half and in the season we won League Two we had Drew Talbot, a right winger who had just moved back to right-back, and Scott Griffiths who liked to bomb forward.

“We got the ball out from the back, passed it around and had goals everywhere.

“It was an exciting team and that’s always been a trademark of his management, he wants his teams to attack and score goals.”

Robertson enjoyed the manager’s style of play and his ability to clearly communicate what he wanted the players to do.

The end product, at least in his second season in charge, was a side that Town fans still laud as one that was tremendously exciting to watch.

In a season that has thus far lacked in terms of quality on the pitch, the hope is that Sheridan can once again generate a buzz at the Proact with the way his team operates.

“It was very simple, keep the ball on the deck, he would never over-complicate things and bamboozle you with instructions and formations,” he said.”

“You’d do a little bit of work towards the end of the week on how you were going to play and the rest of the time it was very short, sharp, quick and technical, small sided games.

“Pass it and move it, almost like a Brian Clough approach.

“It was exciting.”