Tributes paid to 'amazing' and 'bubbly' young man who drowned in Derbyshire river

Tributes have been paid to an 'amazing' and 'bubbly' young man who drowned in a Derbyshire river
Tributes have been paid to an 'amazing' and 'bubbly' young man who drowned in a Derbyshire river

Tributes have been paid to an 'amazing' and 'bubbly' young man who drowned in a Derbyshire river on one of the coldest nights of the year.

Joshua Adams, 23, was found in Glossop Brook on the morning of Sunday, February 3 by a dog walker.

He had been on a night out with two friends but was refused entry to a pub because a door supervisor believed he was 'too drunk'.

Questions remain unanswered as to why he ended up at Glossop Brook and why he got into the water.

At an inquest at Chesterfield Coroner's Court today, Joshua's dad Stephen, said: "He was a lovely young man who was great company.

"He was happy, enthusiastic and a positive young man."

Rory Halley-Hogg, one of Mr Adams's friends who was on the night out with him, said is a statement: "Josh was a bubbly, fun person to be around. He was a really nice guy."

Susan Harvey, owner of Harvey Leonard's bar in Glossop, where Mr Adams worked, said in a statement: "He was an amazing person who had so much to give."

And the door supervisor at The Smithy Folds Wetherspoon pub in Glossop, Mohammad Kayani, who refused Mr Adams entry, said he took the decision 'graciously' and was 'respectful'.

The court heard that Mr Adams 'excelled academically' and graduated with a degree in politics from The University of Nottingham and was considering a career in the Civil Service.

His main interest was music and loved to go to gigs and festivals.

On February 2 Mr Adams went to the Harvey Leonard's bar at about 6.15pm and waited for his friend Jacob Maltby to finish his shift.

The pals had two beers and left to go to The Oakwood pub at 7.30pm where they had one more beer and three cocktails.

They then went to the Decanter bar where they met up with Mr Hogg and had a couple more drinks.

The three friends, who had known each other since secondary school, then headed towards The Smithy Folds Wetherspoon pub just after 10pm.

But Mr Adams, who was walking slightly behind his two friends, was refused entry by door supervisor Mr Kayani because in his opinion Mr Adams had already had enough to drink.

In a statement read out at the inquest, Mr Kayani said that Mr Adams took the decision 'graciously' and was 'respectful' and did not cause any trouble.

Mr Hogg and Mr Maltby tried to call Mr Adams on his mobile phone but there was no answer and they assumed he had gone home.

The inquest heard that it was one of the coldest nights of the winter, with temperatures around -6.

The next morning the body of Mr Adams was found in the Glossop Brook by a dog walker.

Police, firefighters and paramedics attended but Mr Adams was pronounced dead at the scene.

Officers found Mr Adams's mobile phone at the bottom of the water and some of his clothes were found nearby.

It is thought that Mr Adams got into the water, got out and then got in again, but it is not known why.

It is also not known whether he fell, slipped or if he went in to retrieve his phone from the water after possibly dropping it.

It was dark and there is no lighting in the area, something coroner Matthew Kewley said he was going to write to the land owner about.

There are also many unanswered questions as to why he took the route home that he did, as it is not the most obvious one to take, PC Karen Hodgkinson, of Derbyshire police, said.

Dad Stephen added: "It is never going to make sense."

Tests showed that Mr Adams had alcohol in his system.

Mr Kewley recorded the medical cause of death as drowning and alcohol and recorded a narrative conclusion.

"The evidence does not explain why Mr Adams entered Glossop Brook," Mr Kewley said.