Luxury home plans for Grade II listed Peak District mansion

A Grade II listed mansion in the heart of the Peak District is going to be converted back into a luxurious private residence after being used as a hotel for more than 40 years.

Tuesday, 21st December 2021, 11:32 am
Updated Tuesday, 21st December 2021, 11:35 am
Now the new owners have applied for planning permission from the Peak District National Park Authority to restore the west wing to its former glory, the scope of which includes reconstructing the first and second floors, reinstating the west elevation and carrying out work on the second floor staircase.
Now the new owners have applied for planning permission from the Peak District National Park Authority to restore the west wing to its former glory, the scope of which includes reconstructing the first and second floors, reinstating the west elevation and carrying out work on the second floor staircase.

In 2019 it was announced that Hassop Hall, nestled in an idyllic location between Bakewell and Calver, was to close its doors to guests as plans were unveiled to return it back to a single dwelling.

Now the new owners have applied for planning permission from the Peak District National Park Authority to restore the west wing to its former glory, the scope of which includes reconstructing the first and second floors, reinstating the west elevation and carrying out work on the second floor staircase.

A statement by Jessops Heritage Consultancy said: “The proposals have sought to ensure historic fabric where possible, alongside the introduction of a new contemporary space.”

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Hassop Hall

The manor of Hassop is recorded in the Domesday survey of 1086 as the principal residence of the Foljambe family.

In the 14th Century the 11-month old heiress of the estate became the ward of King Richard II, who sold her for 50 marks to Sir John Leake, who in turn sold her for 100 marks to Sir William Plumpton, as a wife for his son.

The house in its present site is believed to have been constructed in 1590 by Rowland Eyre and major remodelling work was carried out in the 1800s by Thomas Eyre.

In the 1950s the west wing was reduced from three storeys to one and a bay removed.

Hassop Hall engraving 1820s

Jessops continued: “The proposals have utilised an opportunity to improve the legibility of the building and its contribution to the setting of surrounding heritage assets by reinstating the upper floors of the west wing demolished in the 1950s and therefore not only will enhance Hassop Hall but the setting of surrounding associated heritage assets.”

An assessment of the second floor staircase concluded it is of 20th Century construction consisting of parts from at least three other staircases.

A design and access statement submitted to the authority by architects Studio Gedye stated: “Whilst the design involves change to historic fabric, this stair has been the site of almost constant change and poor quality repairs.

“Our work will reverse this damage and retain the significant fabric of the stair.

The Grade II listed mansion in the heart of the Peak District is going to be converted back into a luxurious private residence after being used as a hotel for more than 40 years.

“This would enhance the setting of the fabric by removing inappropriate 20th Century work with minimal damage to the building form.”

Works would also be carried out on the ground floor Georgian porch and roof.