Chesterfield pupils bury time capsule with their memories of 2020

Pupils and staff at a Chesterfield school have buried their memories of 2020 for future generations to look back on.

Tuesday, 6th October 2020, 4:45 pm

Highfield Hall Primary School is currently having two new classrooms built for its year three children – and they were given permission to bury a time capsule underneath the development on Friday.

The time capsule includes pupils’ pictures and their thoughts about this historic year.

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Highfield Hall Primary School pupils Harry, Susie, Elliott, Lily, Alex and Tommi-Lee with teachers Miss Sullivan and Mrs Webster during the planting of the time capsule. Pictures by Brian Eyre.
Highfield Hall Primary School pupils Harry, Susie, Elliott, Lily, Alex and Tommi-Lee with teachers Miss Sullivan and Mrs Webster during the planting of the time capsule. Pictures by Brian Eyre.

Ahead of the burial, Emily Sullivan, a year three teacher at the school, said: “With so much history surrounding the school already, both the children and staff are so excited to leave their own legacy behind.

“The children are really excited about burying the time capsule underneath their brand new classrooms.

“The year 2020 has been full of important events and this is a fantastic opportunity to document this for future generations.”

Many of the children’s observations will, of course, be about the coronavirus pandemic – and they should be proud of how they have responded to the crisis.

Highfield Hall Primary School pupils Harry, Susie, Elliott, Lily, Alex and Tommi-Lee during the planting of the time capsule.

Pupils drew brightly-coloured pictures of rainbows, animals, sunshine and hearts which were made into cards.

These were delivered to people living in the Newbold area, filling them with joy at a particularly difficult time.

The school building on Highfield Lane, Newbold, has a rich history – something which is also ackowledged in the time capsule.

It was originally a Georgian mansion built by the Eyre family before 1800 and it has been a school since 1930.

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