Meaning of life

Philip Stewart and John Hester as the iconic Vladimir and Estragon. in Waiting for Godot at Chesterfield's Pomegranate Theatre.
Philip Stewart and John Hester as the iconic Vladimir and Estragon. in Waiting for Godot at Chesterfield's Pomegranate Theatre.

NOTHING going on. Nothing to be done.

What does it mean? What is it about? It beats me. But once you realise that that’s the whole point – that it’s not supposed to make any kind of logical sense – it all falls into place, and you can simply sit back and enjoy the ride.

The first act is funny, violent, tedious, scary and poignant by turns; in Talking Scarlet’s production of Waiting for Godot at the Pomegranate this week, the second act is much the same, with added Christmas. A bit like real life.

The first night audience was gratifyingly (and surprisingly) large, and seemed as riveted as I was by John Hester and Philip Stewart as the two tramps waiting for the eponymous Godot.

Al Naed rang the changes as loud, overbearing Pozzo, and John Goodrum as the almost-mute Lucky got enthusiastic applause for the long nonsense speech which finally broke his silence.

Dominic Vulliamy, seen in last year’s rep season’s ‘difficult’ play Equus, made only two fleeting appearances, but he’s an asset to any theatre company.

It’s a play which can make you laugh, cry and wonder about the meaning of life, just as the author intended. It passed the time, say the tramps. This production does far more.

It runs till Saturday, and the Pomegranate’s rep season continues till March 10.