Pensions rough justice: Why punish workers?

During my working life I was made to pay into a compulsory private pension scheme.

Meanwhile, those who did not have to pay into such a scheme would probably spend the equivalent of what I was made to pay into the scheme on having a good time – on things like booze, cigarettes, holidays and cars.

On retiring, I found that what I received from the private pension prevented me from getting any financial help with anything, whilst those who did not have to pay into a private pension scheme received such things as a pension credit, housing benefit, help with council tax, dental bills and what have you.

Recently, my wife sadly pased away and I was asked by the Department for Work and Pensions if I would like any financial help with my late wife’s funeral bill to which I replied yes, but heard no more from them.

I went on a bereavement course where other bereaved people like myself, were saying that they had received help with their funeral bills (average £2,000).

When I telephoned the DWP to enquire why I had not recieved any financial help with my wifes funeral bill, I was advised that I did not qualify because I was not in receipt of pension credit, housing beneift or any other benefits that those who did not have to pay into a private pension shceme were getting.

To me justice would be return all that we were compulsory made to pay into the scheme and start paying us all the benefits that those who did not have to pay into such a scheme get.

I lost two members of my family in World War Two and I was compulsory made to serve my country in the armed forces, so I can only assume that the DWP think that because we had a rough time fighting in the War, veterans are trained to cope with rough justice in peace time.

Veteran Widow

Name and address supplied