Incredulous that plan is still going ahead in Bolsover

I read the article in last Thursday’s edition of the newspaper regarding the continuing saga of Bolsover District Council’s unlawful sale of Sherwood Lodge, Bolsover to Morrisons with total disbelief. The report appeared to be a rehash of a previous article and photograph that appeared when the BDC announced its ill founded decision.

Incredulous is too an adequate word to describe my amazement that the sale is allegedly still proceeding given the fact that the council at its meeting on May 28, 2014, took the decision to withdraw its Bolsover District Local Plan Strategy despite a firm ruling by the Local Government Ombudsman that the plan should be submitted by May 6.

Surely, the withdrawl of the strategy raises serious questions for Morrisons regarding the commercial viability of the proposed development of its supermarket and petrol station in the context of a non-existent housing projection.

The Ombudsman in November 2013 made clear in her judgement that the sale of the site was unlawful and that the council had failed to correctly advertise the land as open space. Yet the council evidently persists to flout the law no matter the serious nature of the judgements are made against it.

It is high time that the surcharging of councillors be reintroduced in order to rectify their unlawful decisions and to protect council tax payers from their incompetences.

Currently, there is no mechanism by which councillors can be held to account other than judicial review whose excessive costs are way beyond the average person.

Kenneth Duvall

Elmton

Incredulous is too an adequate word to describe my amazement that the sale is allegedly still proceeding given the fact that the council at its meeting on May 28, 2014, took the decision to withdraw its Bolsover District Local Plan Strategy despite a firm ruling by the Local Government Ombudsman that the plan should be submitted by May 6.

Surely, the withdrawl of the strategy raises serious questions for Morrisons regarding the commercial viability of the proposed development of its supermarket and petrol station in the context of a non-existent housing projection.

The Ombudsman in November 2013 made clear in her judgement that the sale of the site was unlawful and that the council had failed to correctly advertise the land as open space. Yet the council evidently persists to flout the law no matter the serious nature of the judgements are made against it.

It is high time that the surcharging of councillors be reintroduced in order to rectify their unlawful decisions and to protect council tax payers from their incompetences.

Currently, there is no mechanism by which councillors can be held to account other than judicial review whose excessive costs are way beyond the average person.

Kenneth Duvall

Elmton