Blue bugle symbolises beauty and peace

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Whilst it is right that the humble field poppy is symbolic with our Armed Forces and especially those who gave their lives - the ultimate sacrifice in the Great Wars of the early 20th Century and the mid 20th century also.

However, to me just as symbolic is a beautiful blue flowered plant that is so prolific at this time of year, namely The Bugle.

How amazing is nature, in that it too flowers during the months of June and July when we remember ‘the fallen’ as well as those engaged in current conflicts around the world as well.

Also, the bugle is the sound soldiers would hear last at night and again first thing in the morning as they rise to face yet another challenging day.

In Spital cemetery in Chesterfield, under a large conifer tree, an Irish soldier, William Coffey, was laid to rest on July 13, 1875, and the Bugle is growing all around his grave.

Despite being born in the Emerald Isle, William Coffey made the Sheffield and Chesterfield area his home. Being one of the first people to be awarded the Victoria Cross (in 1854 i believe) William Coffey saved the lives of many of his colleagues when an unexploded shell landed in the trenches during the Crimean War and the super hero picked the live shell up and threw it back out as quickly as possible before it did explode.

How ironic then that the Crimea is once again a very unsettled area in the world, but to me the Blue bugle reminds us all of beauty and peace as we try to settle down after yet another day of conundrums all around the country.

The blue Bugle carpets our lawns and verges to symbolise it all, to my mind anyway.

Geoff A. Evans

Stanfree

However, to me just as symbolic is a beautiful blue flowered plant that is so prolific at this time of year, namely The Bugle.

How amazing is nature, in that it too flowers during the months of June and July when we remember ‘the fallen’ as well as those engaged in current conflicts around the world as well.

Also, the bugle is the sound soldiers would hear last at night and again first thing in the morning as they rise to face yet another challenging day.

In Spital cemetery in Chesterfield, under a large conifer tree, an Irish soldier, William Coffey, was laid to rest on July 13, 1875, and the Bugle is growing all around his grave.

Despite being born in the Emerald Isle, William Coffey made the Sheffield and Chesterfield area his home. Being one of the first people to be awarded the Victoria Cross (in 1854 i believe) William Coffey saved the lives of many of his colleagues when an unexploded shell landed in the trenches during the Crimean War and the super hero picked the live shell up and threw it back out as quickly as possible before it did explode.

How ironic then that the Crimea is once again a very unsettled area in the world, but to me the Blue bugle reminds us all of beauty and peace as we try to settle down after yet another day of conundrums all around the country.

The blue Bugle carpets our lawns and verges to symbolise it all, to my mind anyway.

Geoff A. Evans

Stanfree