VIDEO: Hundreds pay tribute to tragic Staveley biker

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Hundreds of motorcycle enthusiasts came together on Sunday to pay an emotional tribute to tragic Staveley biker, Mark Raynor.

Mark died last Sunday afternoon after the bike he was riding collided with a car on Ringwood Road in Brimington.

Hundreds of bikers came from miles around to pay tribute to Mark Raynor.

Hundreds of bikers came from miles around to pay tribute to Mark Raynor.

After meeting at the All Inn on Lowgates in Staveley this morning, the convoy passed the scene of the accident before travelling to Matlock Bath and finishing up at the CMC cafe in Clay Cross.

One of those present was Mark’s partner, Tracy Banks, 40, with whom he had been in a relationship for 22 years.

She said: “He would have loved this. He was such a character - I’m lost for words.

“He was a lovable rogue who would do anything for anybody.

Mark's daughter, Rebecca Booth, tribute ride organiser, Sarah Smith and Mark's partner, Tracy Banks gather at the All Inn in Staveley.

Mark's daughter, Rebecca Booth, tribute ride organiser, Sarah Smith and Mark's partner, Tracy Banks gather at the All Inn in Staveley.

“Bikes and cars were his life and he went to the TT races every year but as well as that he also loved his pets - they were his babies.

“He had three French bulldogs, Hannah, Rocco and Florence and a parrot, Sally - the eldest, Hannah, cries because she misses him.”

Mark’s father, Brian, who is 69 and from Boythorpe, was also there and his mother, Janet, 68, was at the roadside further along the route with one of the couple’s grandchildren.

Organiser, Sarah Smith, said: “It’s a really, really impressive turnout.

The motorcycling community is a tight knit one.

The motorcycling community is a tight knit one.

“As well as paying tribute to Mark we’re raising money as well which will be split 50/50 between the RSPCA and the air ambulance.

“And we’re also going to buy a bench for the CMC cafe which was Mark’s favourite place for a brew.”

But as well as Mark’s family and friends there were many there who had never met him, but who wanted to pay their respects nevertheless.

Richard Scott, 50, said: “Word went out on Facebook and I wanted to come down as a mark of respect - it could have happened to anybody.

“A lot of the people here today are about Mark’s age - you grow up with bikes and it stays with you.”