‘Radical’ traffic plan for rat-run Chesterfield road

Trevorrow Crescent in Chesterfield as it is today.

Trevorrow Crescent in Chesterfield as it is today.

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‘Radical’ work to give pedestrians and cyclists priority over cars on some Chesterfield roads is due to start in January.

The work will mean cars turning on and off Derby Road at four places will have to give way to walkers and riders.

An artists impression of how the Trevorrow Crescent junction will look.

An artists impression of how the Trevorrow Crescent junction will look.

At three of those places - Byron Street, Revers Buller Road and Lord Roberts Road - the amount of traffic is low.

However, the changes may impact more on drivers using the Trevorrow Crescent junction which is commonly used as a ‘rat run’ between Derby Road and Park Road.

A Derbyshire County Council spokesman said: “Traffic is already very busy in this area and with plans for more housing nearby demand for travel will only increase further.

“This scheme is being done in line with the county council’s commitment to improving conditions for cyclists and pedestrians.

The three other roads in the plan will be changed to look like this.

The three other roads in the plan will be changed to look like this.

“The white lines that mark out the junctions to the side roads of Byron Street, Trevorrow Crescent, Redvers Buller Road and Lord Roberts Road will be changed, an existing traffic island will be removed and a humped plateau will be put in so that walkers and bike riders get priority to cross these junctions over vehicles that are turning into these streets.

“We consulted on these changes and the improvements are expected to start on January 16, with work expecting to last between eight to 12 weeks.”

The county council says it wants to change the ‘character’ of the junctions for pedestrians and cyclists.

Motorists leaving these streets would need to approach the junction ‘with caution’, giving way to footway users as required by the Highway Code.

It says evidence from other places where similar things have been tried suggests that motorists are more cautious when entering or leaving the side roads, making it safer for all.