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New roost for weathervane

Former Tower Captain Philip Mehew and his wife, Angela, who recovered the cockerel after its fall to the parapet.

Former Tower Captain Philip Mehew and his wife, Angela, who recovered the cockerel after its fall to the parapet.

The ancient cockerel weathervane that graced the steeple of All Saints Church at Ashover for well over 250 years is to be given a new home.

The ancient cockerel weathervane that graced the steeple of All Saints Church at Ashover for well over 250 years is to be given a new home.

The cock, which is reported to date back to the mid-1700s, was dislodged from its lofty pedestal 128 feet above Church Street in the earthquake of February 2008.

It crashed on to the parapet around the tower and was subsequently found to be too fragile to repair and return to its original home.

Now, the Church Council has agreed that it should be securely fixed to the frame of the bell-ringing chamber window high above the font.

“The cockerel is an important part of our church history and deserves to be seen by everyone who visits All Saints,” said the rector, the Rev Ralph Lawrence.

A new cockerel weathervane was installed during repair work to the spire and tower at All Saints. It was designed, produced and gilded by Matlock artist-architect Richard Swain with support from Bill Barker of Matlock Green and Pidcock Brothers Engineers of Cromford.

Flashback: The image shows former Tower Captain Philip Mehew and his wife, Angela, who recovered the cockerel after its fall to the parapet.

 

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