Much-loved Alfreton man, 25, killed himself after job claim

Andrew Papworth.
Andrew Papworth.

A much-loved young man hanged himself after he claimed he had lost out on a job, an inquest heard.

Andrew Papworth – who was described as “very kind and very generous” – was found dead by his mother and sister at his home on Brook Avenue in Alfreton.

Chesterfield coroners’ court heard the 25-year-old said he had been promised a cleaning job at the Alliance Healthcare depot in South Normanton but that it was given to someone else.

A representative from Alliance Healthcare told Thursday’s hearing that the job had not been filled on a permanent basis at the time of Mr Papworth’s death.

Gerard Papworth last saw his son – who already worked at the depot as a warehouse operative – on June 17, 2013, the day before he was found dead.

He said: “He was considerably down as he told me a job he’d been after and almost promised was going to another guy.

“He was a very quiet lad, very kind and very generous.

“He was very good with computers and he loved his gadgets.”

One of his colleagues, Karen Allingham, told the court: “I last worked with Andrew on June 17 – he was a lovely young man.

“We had lunch together and he seemed very, very quiet and down.

“He said the job that he was promised was given to someone else.”

Michael Stocks, a human resource business partner at Alliance Healthcare, said: “At the time of Mr Papworth’s death, the cleaning job had not been filled on a permanent basis.”

His mother, Gwen Papworth, told the court she did not think her son intended to kill himself.

She said: “He was planning ahead and had lots to look forward to.

“He had plans for his garden, he was planning a loft conversion and he was looking forward to going on holiday with us.”

She added: “I just think he had a fit of temper because he thought he’d get the job.”

No suicide note was found.

Addressing Mr Papworth’s family, coroner Paul McCandless said: “Andrew was very much loved by you and he loved you dearly.”

Mr McCandless said he had “very real and significant doubts” that Mr Papworth intended to kill himself and therefore ruled out a verdict of suicide.

Instead, he recorded a narrative verdict setting out the facts of his death.