Historic Staveley site could be brought back to life

Clocktower Perspective ' An artists impression of the view northwards along Works Road towards the retained Clocktower Business Centre, with new offices, shops and community uses along a rejuvenated main street at the heart of the community.

Clocktower Perspective ' An artists impression of the view northwards along Works Road towards the retained Clocktower Business Centre, with new offices, shops and community uses along a rejuvenated main street at the heart of the community.

0
Have your say

A major sprawl of derelict land could be brought back to life and transformed in to a modern marina, businesses and homes.

Regeneration proposals are being drawn up for the once bustling Staveley Works - a factory site for over 200 years which now lies almost vacant.

The ambitious 20-year scheme, being put together by Chesterfield Borough Council and Chatsworth Estate, the land owners, includes a new marina, with businesses, shops, homes, a new park, primary school and a link road.

The masterplan for the 200-hectare industrial corridor, along Chesterfield canal, have been drawn up by planning consultancy Capita Symonds. The company, which is representing Chatsworth Estate, says the site has scope to meet housing needs, provide new facilities and services and enhance the area’s wealth of industrial heritage.

A spokesman said: “The regeneration will lead to a wide ranging social, economic and environmental benefits to the community, the borough and the region.

“This masterplan provides a blueprint for comprehensive development in the future to make the area a safe and attractive place to live, work and invest in.”

A Chatsworth spokesman said the Estate looked forward to continuing to work with the council and local people to bring the new development to the area and welcomed feedback on its ideas.

Staveley Works area sits in the valley between New Whittington, Brimington, Barrow Hill, Hollingwood and Staveley.

The site has a long history of industrial development, including mining, iron and steel making and chemical production but large parts of the site now lie vacant.

Regeneration could see a marina developed to the east of Works Road along with a pub and hotel. Other plans include the Clocktower business being refurbished, the Rother Valley Link road extended, a network of footpaths and cycleways created and a supermarket, drive-through restaurant or petrol station.

Scott Nicholas senior planner at the borough council said: “The council - in consultation with land owners and the local community - is currently preparing a masterplan plan for this area which will eventually be know as the Staveley and Rother Valley Corridor Area Action Plan.

“The aim of this plan is to regenerate the area over the long-term via new housing and employment uses with a strong emphasis on protecting and enhancing the Chesterfield Canal and River Rother corridors.

“It’s an important site for the council so planning officers have been working closely with the land owners to ensure that any scheme that does come forward is properly planned and respects the aspirations of the council and local community.”

Staveley town councillors discussed the masterplan at its last meeting.

A spokesman for the council said it generally welcomed the proposals but raised concerns about another supermarket and the development’s connection to the town centre.

Ian Haddock, of the council, said: “The town council want to make sure we get the best development for the town and that benefits everybody in the area.”

Since 1786 industry has been a feature of Staveley.

During the First World War Staveley Coal and Iron Company developed its chemical operations and a plant has been on the site since. But American owners Covidien announced the factory will close by the end of the year.

The plant is now in the process of dismantling and closing down with a small crew in place.

A total of 64 operations jobs at the plant will be made redundant while ten people will be relocating to office space in the Chesterfield.

A spokesman for the firm said: “The action was based on the company’s decision to consolidate the manufacturing of para-aminophenol at the Raleigh, North Carolina, site.”

Ian Haddock of Staveley town council said: “It is the end of an era. Works have been on that site for hundreds of years.”