DCSIMG

Quarry reopens for Chatsworth

editorial image

editorial image

Peak Park chiefs have approved plans to reopen Burntwood Quarry to help with the restoration of Chatsworth House.

Stone from the quarry, near Beeley, will be extracted for six weeks each year, over a 15-year period, specifically for the conservation of Chatsworth House.

The application area covers 1.72 hectares and the plans also include landscaping and conservation works, and the use of an existing access and agricultural shed.

At their last meeting, members of the Peak District National Park Authority planning committee heard that the stone at Burntwood Quarry matched the six kinds of stone needed for the restoration of the house.

Will Kemp, planning and development manager at Chatsworth, said: “Chatsworth is a grade I-listed building made out of local Ashover grit stone that has been extensively weathered over 250 years.

“The scheme is needed to benefit such a sensitive restoration of a nationally important building.”

The quarry was last worked more than 100 years ago and is now covered in vegetation and trees, some of which will have to be removed to make way for the quarrying operation, the meeting heard.

However, plans are in place to replace some vegetation.

The site will be worked in six phases over the 15-year period with work at the quarry restricted to a maximum of six weeks each year, split into two blocks of three – one in March and one in August.

Cllr Tony Favell, said: “It gives me great pleasure to move this recommendation (for approval).

“I’d like to take the opportunity to congratulate Chatsworth on the work they have been doing. It is a glorious building that gives a great deal of pleasure to those people fortunate enough to live in the park and those who visit.”

A number of conditions were imposed on the application, including one specifying that the extracted stone is used solely on buildings and land related to either Chatsworth House or the estate.

The total quantity of stone to be extracted from the site would be over 79,000 tonnes, members heard, which would be more than sufficient to complete the restoration work.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page