Derbyshire police take action on danger roads

Police have been called into Hodgson High in Poulton
Police have been called into Hodgson High in Poulton

Police are targeting the most notorious roads in the Dales in a bid to improve safety.

Following an agreement with the Road Safety Partnership, Derbyshire police will focus its efforts to detect speeding on more than 100 routes where people face a higher risk of being killed or hurt as a result of motorists travelling too fast.

The new speeding action plan has been drawn up following a detailed review of Derbyshire casualty figures and speed data. As a result, motorists can expect to find police speed enforcement officers in many new locations around the county.

Chief Inspector Tracy Lewis, head of roads policing in Derbyshire, said: “Our goal is to keep people safe. That’s why we’re so keen to publicise these higher risk routes where we’ll be focusing our efforts.”

The routes singled out include the A515 Parsley Hay, A57 Snake Pass, A619 Baslow Road Bakewell, A623 Calver, A623 Stoney Middleton to Peak Forest, A625 Froggatt, A632 Matlock, Leashaw Holloway, Main Road Hulland Ward and Sheffield Road Hathersage.

Several points of the A6 have been highlighted, including Ashford–in–the–Water, Bakewell Road, Darley Dale, Cromford to Ambergate, Derby Road, Cromford, and Northwood, Darley Dale.

Several points on the A615 have also been targeted, including Alfreton Road, Tansley, Matlock Green, Tansley to Wessington and Wessington village.

The be using methods to detect speed such as in–car computers, hand–held laser guns, cameras fitted with liveried vans and motorcycles and cameras in yellow roadside boxes.

Ch Insp Lewis continued: “We want to discourage people from speeding rather than catch them as the fear of speeding traffic is blighting so many of our communities who look to us for help.”

Chief Inspector Lewis added: “We also want to remind people that a small increase in speed makes a big difference to the amount of harm you will cause if you hit someone. The risk of death is approximately four times higher when a pedestrian is hit at 40mph rather than at 30mph.”